books like in five years

12 Books Like In Five Years by Rebecca Serle

12 Books Like In Five Years by Rebecca Serle

Books like In Five Years remind us that sometimes, having no plan can be a good plan. 

As all of us have experienced, life tends to steer its course, whether we surrender to the idea of it or not.

Rebecca Serle’s books have a common theme – the dialogue between fate and free will.

Serle does an amazing job on the plot development as well as the relatable moments where life decides to take a turn and surprise us.

Read on to learn more about In Five Years novel and find similar books to devour immediately!

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What is In Five Years about? 

At first glance, In Five Years novel sounds like a time travel novel about knowing what the future holds in five years. But it’s really not what you would expect at all. 

It’s a book about the power of friendship, loyalty and of course, both the unpredictable nature of destiny and love which makes this book heartbreaking and heartwarming. 

A heads-up that while the characters are in their late 20s, there are still a handful of YA terms that may put off some adult romance readers. 

But nonetheless, the storyline of Rebecca Serle’s In Five Years pushes us to think beyond the question: “Where do you see yourself in five years?”. Because it seems like destiny always finds a way.

Rebecca Serle Books

If you’re interested to explore more of Rebecca Serle‘s books other than In Five Years, check out her other books:

Now, let’s dive into books similar to In Five Years that you shouldn’t miss out on!

12 Books Like In Five Years by Rebecca Serle 

1. The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid

Genre: Historical Fiction, Romance 

Amazon rating: 4.6/5

Goodreads rating: 4.48/5

What do readers say? 

Readers who are familiar with author Reid’s writing, knows that her books will ruin them (in the best way possible!). And without a doubt, The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo did exactly that.  

This historical fiction romance novel explores themes of love, loss, acceptance, sacrifice, and tragedy.

Written in dual timeline and POVs of both Evelyn and Monique, it helps readers easily empathise with both characters throughout the story.  

Despite what the title may suggest, The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo doesn’t actually revolve around the husbands, but rather Evelyn herself. A real page-turner if I say so myself.

Reid was very inclusive with her characters in terms of identities of colour representation and sexualities. 

There’s nothing more to add without spoilers, so I highly encourage you to pick this book up!

2. Every Last Secret by A.R. Torre 

Genre: Psychological Fiction, Thriller 

Amazon rating: 4.3/5

Goodreads rating: 4.03/5

What do readers say? 

Every Last Secret is another novel that writes in dual perspectives – Neena’s and Cat’s. As the summary mentions, it’s a fight over William’s attention. 

Some readers might say it’s “Mean Girls for grown-ups”, so you can expect plentiful wicked schemes and counterplotting between these women.

Despite that, readers felt the characters were both fictional yet somewhat grounded in reality.

If you’re in the mood to do some guessing and you dig suspense, Every Last Secret is the book you should read.

A fun fact? Authors A.R. Torre and Alessandra Torre are actually the same person! She uses the pseudonym for thrillers and her full name for romances.

3. It Ends With Us by Colleen Hoover

Genre: Contemporary Romance

Amazon rating: 4.7/5

Goodreads rating: 4.41/5

What do readers say? 

If you’ve read In Five Years, you’ll realise that the storyline is not what you’d expect it to be at first glance. It Ends With Us is just as unassuming. 

Unlike most romance novels, It Ends With Us highlights the darker side of love and sheds light on the internal conflict that women of domestic violence face. 

It’s best to look up the trigger warnings in this book before purchasing it as it contains themes of domestic abuse and violence.

Overall, a raw and heartbreaking read that pushes the idea that sometimes it’s the one who loves you who hurts you the most.

4. One Day In December by Josie Silver 

Genre: Contemporary Romance

Amazon rating: 4.3/5

Goodreads rating: 3.9/5

What do readers say? 

There are mixed reviews from readers about this Reese’s Book Club pick. Some readers even DNF (did not finish) as it was draggy to wait for the plot. 

There is plenty of inner dialogue surrounding love, guilt & friendship between Laurie, Sarah and Jack which makes it hard not to fall in love with them.

To sum it up, One Day In December is an easy, predictable and mindless holiday read.

5. The Last Thing He Told Me by Laura Dave

Genre: Psychological Fiction, Thriller

Amazon rating: 4.3/5

Goodreads rating: 3.90/5

What do readers say? 

Unlike most books in the psychological thrillers genre, there aren’t any themes of violence, abuse or gory scenes. 

There are mixed reviews about the ending where readers expressed their disappointment towards the lack of a happy ending as most books would usually promise.

However, similar in some aspects to In Five Years, it is also a story of two women – Hannah and Bailey – bonding amidst life-altering moments and finding out the life as they know is not what Owen paints it to be. 

This is a great read if you’re feeling adventurous and want a book that’ll keep you up at night without the scare.

6. Dear Edward by Ann Napolitano 

Genre: Fiction

Amazon rating: 4.5/5

Goodreads rating: 4.09/5

What do readers say? 

Inspired by true events, Dear Edward is a coming of age story about loss and grief. The story is similar to the In Five Years is written in dual timeline.

Except within a five year timeline, it’s a “before crash” and “after crash” situation. 

The book teaches us that as humans, especially during extremely difficult times, are wired for connection to reconnect with ourselves. 

Readers also applaud the stylistic approach Napolitano wrote about Edward’s trauma, emotions and how he navigates around such complex feelings as a child.

A highly recommended read that’ll keep you emotionally invested.

7. Fifty Words for Rain by Asha Lemmie

Genre: Historical Fiction, Domestic Fiction

Amazon rating: 4.3/5

Goodreads rating: 3.90/5

What do readers say? 

Set in post-World War 2 Japan, Nori is an African-Japanese girl/woman itches to discover herself and her place in the world despite the oppression she faces back home as an illegitimate child. 

The plot may be predictable where Nori’s metamorphosis into a strong, determined woman and an unapologetic heroine occurs through the endless suffering she endured. But her journey throughout the book is definitely worth highlighting.  

This book contains scenes of racism, xenophobia, rape, abuse and slavery that may be triggering to some. 

Lemmie’s debut novel is raw and an exceptional story about self-discovery, the uncomfortable truth of institutionalised prejudice and racism. 

If you’re into a heavier read and looking to read something refreshing, Fifty Words of Rain is for you. 

8. The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett

Genre: Literary Fiction

Amazon rating: 4.4/5

Goodreads rating: 4.19/5

What do readers say? 

We all know the phrase: “Our pasts dictates our future.” The Vanishing Half is no doubt, one of the books similar to In Five Years, weaving out of past and present and how the forces of life will pull two people together. 

There were mixed reviews about the ending of the book specifically, with readers being discontented that the ending was an open ending rather than an actual end. 

Despite that, fans of Brit Bennette will not be disappointed.

Readers agree that it was an effortless read despite the heavier themes of race as Bennett threads her words in a thoughtful way. 

A multilayered, honest read that offers a genuine perspective about racial and gender identity and the secrets we keep in fear of rejection from the people we love most. 

9. The Giver of Stars by Jojo Meyes 

Genre: Historical Fiction, Domestic Fiction

Amazon rating: 4.6/5

Goodreads rating: 4.28/5

What do readers say?  

Based on a true story rooted in America’s past, The Giver Of Stars revolves around the adventures of a group of women whom, despite being regarded as outcasts, find their place as women in society. 

Readers would strongly agree that while the genre of this book differs slightly from Meyes’ usual writings of romances, she did an amazing job on her research about the era and the location. 

There are themes of racism, misogyny and exploitation, so do take these trigger warnings into account before reading.

This book is definitely a feel good read that explores the blossoming of women friendships in unexpected times and brings to life an interesting chapter in America’s history.

The Giver Of Stars is a beautifully written love letter to the power of books and friendship, as simple as that.

10. One Italian Summer by Rebecca Serle

Genre: Contemporary Fiction, Domestic Fiction

Amazon rating: 4.2/5

Goodreads rating: 3.70/5

What do readers say?  

If you liked reading In Five Years then you’re gonna enjoy another one of Rebecca Serle books, One Italian Summer is a novel about mother-daughter love.

The best part? The backstory is partially inspired by true events!

An Italian Summer is a book that highlights Katy’s life-altering moments when her mother passes of cancer and ventures on their planned trip to Italy together. 

Readers were definitely immersed in this novel that taught lessons of dealing with loss and how we navigate around grief and how the people we love never truly leave us if we look hard enough.

11. The Last Flight by Julie Clark

Genre: Psychological Fiction, Thriller

Amazon rating: 4.4/5

Goodreads rating: 4.12/5

What do readers say?  

If you enjoyed the female friendships theme in In Five Years, this thrilling suspenseful book is a must!

This book is fast-paced but not rushed. Suspenseful but just enough to get your heart racing until the end of the book.

Claire and Eva’s encounters at the airport really got the story to quite literally take off. And we follow as both of them face different challenges at every corner.  

Both Claire and Eva were written in a very grounded way with flaws and making relatable mistakes, allowing readers to easily empathise with them.

This book contains trigger warnings of physical and emotional abuse. 

Readers expressed they took their time to devour The Last Flight. It is an unpredictable thriller filled with supportive side characters and a well waited plot development. 

12. My One Truth North by Milly Johnson 

Genre: Contemporary Romance

Amazon rating: 4.7/5

Goodreads rating: 4.37/5

What do readers say?  

If you’re looking for more books like In Five Years, My One Truth North plays around with how intertwined Pete and Laurie’s lives are even before they’ve met. 

This book is a page turner and an emotional rollercoaster that’s still grounded in reality.

It also teaches readers that we are allowed to break down, shatter ourselves and we are still deserving of love and compassion. 

Readers found it easy to fall in love with the characters as the story follows how both the protagonists navigate around their dealings with grief. 

Overall, author Millie Johnson wrote an enveloping book that explores the beauty of being human by being able to experience an array of emotions – from friendship to anger to grief and joy.  

And that checks out a list of books to read if you liked reading In Five Years! 

These recommendations are perfect for readers who are looking to explore new genres and I hope you find your next binge worthy read amongst this list of books!

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